Movie Review

The Omega Code

MPAA Rating: PG-13 for some violence and disturbing images of the future

Reviewed by: Douglas Downs
STAFF WRITER

Good
Moviemaking Quality:

Primary Audience:
Teens Adults
Genre:
Drama
Length:
1 hr. 50 min.

Starring: Michael York, Casper Van Dien, Catherine Oxenburg, Michael Ironside | Director/Producer: Robert Marcarelli | Writer/Co-Producer: Stephan Blinn | Produced by: Code Productions, Inc. | Distributor: Providence Entertainment

I am thankful for the great inspirational Christian films of the past… movies like “The Cross and the Switchblade”, “The Hiding Place,” and “China Cry”. They were films that ignited the embers of faith in us all. “The Omega Code” is by far the best film to date with a religious theme. I applaud its writer, director, producer, sponsors, actors, and staff for a brilliant piece of film making. It is THE film for Christians to recommend. It is THE film to take the “lost” to see. We should support this film with the “best” word-of-mouth-advertising we can give it. “The Omega Code” deserves all the enthusiasm of “Star Wars”.

Filmed in Israel, Italy, and the U.S., this film uses the popularity of “The Bible Code” to weave an incredibly accurate revelation of biblical prophecy. I must admit that I was skeptical at first. The “hype” of hidden codes is well crafted into the story. The film uses these elements to present an edge-of-your-seat suspense.

“The Omega Code” clearly presents the war that wages between the forces of dark and the forces of light. It begins with Dr. Gillen Lane (Casper Van Dien) as a popular world-famous motivational speaker who is drawn into the intrigue of uniting the world in peace. He is recruited by European Union Chairman Stone Alexander (Michael York) to help bring his vision of the world to power. Stone is a natural born leader and uses the money he has from his large media empire the ALEXANDER SATELLITE NETWORK to fund peace. His passion soon unites the world. Lane becomes trapped in this web of terror and deceit. He comes face to face with the reality that Stone is the incarnation of Satan himself as the ancient books of Biblical prophecy foretold.

The film is full of great values. Dr. Lane is a workaholic and his marriage is on the rocks. He is encouraged to work on that important relationship. The story is filled with great lines like “The worth of a real man is shown on the countenance of his wife’s face”. There is a clear line of good versus evil and how choices can be made. Parents will love the fact there is no sex or language in this film. The violence is minimal and a small amount of alcohol is consumed. I highly recommend this film even for older children. Pass the word, this film is GREAT!

Other Recommendations:

NOTE FROM THE PUBLISHER: One of our concerns about this TBN movie from a Christian perspective is the inclusion of the so-called Bible Codes. These controversial “codes” have been promoted by such authors as Michael Drosnin, Grant Jeffrey, and others. The claim is that the Hebrew Old Testament contains newly discovered, divinely encoded information. This information is “coded” through the use of equidistant Hebrew letter sequencing. After having studied this issue for a couple of years, we have serious reservations this theory. For information on the Internet about this subject, see the following Christian sites: Christian Information Ministries, Probe, and Prophezine. Non-Christian sites: [1] “Assassinations Foretold in Moby Dick!,” [2] “Scientific Refutation of the Bible Codes”

Year of Release—1999

Viewer Comments
Comments below:
Positive
“should be applauded and supported”… I completely agree with your review. This movie should be applauded and fully supported for taking a giant step forward in the world of Christian filmmaking. This is a movie that presents the gospel in a non-offensive way for the unbeliever. The story is great. The effects are great. Michael York is great. But the best part of all of this is that it is evident the Lord has his hand on this picture. I went with many unbelievers and after seeing the movie they all said they were going home to look at their bibles to find out about prophecy. This movie is history in the making and needs and deserves the full support of the entire church. My Ratings: [5/4]
—Susan Cooke, age 25
“God’s spirit is in the works of this” …the purpose [of the movie] is to get the lost to see a glimpse of something close to fact—to jar their interest to go to read their bible (which has been happening all over the country). Prayer is being held in the lobbies and songs of worship and healing has occurred. The lost are grateful and are getting saved in the theatres saying to Jesus to save them. This is the intent. Not to bash other Christians or thwart the scriptures. God’s spirit is in the works of this. It is not hard to see… My Ratings: [5/5]
—Lisa Clevenger, age 36
“a powerful evangelistic tool”… I don’t know why Christians are complaining about this movie. I would like to know of any other major motion picture where you can hear “Jesus save me.” Also, there is no sex, no swearing, and very little violence. I think that it is a powerful evangelistic tool and Christians should be proud of it. Look past the little problems with the movie and look at the bigger picture—people are getting saved because of this movie. I think Jesus is happy because of that. My Ratings: [4½/3]
—Jimmy, age 27
impressive …I’m surprised by the other comments… I was very impressed with “The Omega Code,” the production and special effects were amazing, especially considering the low budget of just 7 million. We as Christians can nit-pick about some details of the film, things left out, things included, etc., etc… but the overall beauty of this movie is that its biblically based, void of foul language/sex and other common objectionable content, and its highly entertaining. It’s a biblical thriller! It’s a movie that can be used as a tool to challenge people to check out the Bible, to think about the end of the world, to ponder about God and seek after Him. It’s also a movie that will make Hollywood take notice of the market for wholesome entertainment! I’ve seen the movie twice already, and will probably see it again. I really enjoyed it and look forward to the sequel, and other biblically based movies that I can support, be entertained and encouraged by… My Ratings: [4/4]
—Michael Harms, age 25
“opens up opportunities for meaningful discussions”… On the whole, a great film to get a look at a potential scenario for the end times. This IS NO World Wide Productions film (with all due respect to Mr. Billy Graham and his ministry). There is no alter call, no sermon being preached to a capacity filled stadium, no television screen showing Christian programming (boldly proclaiming the Gospel message). This is a film which, for the most part, boldly goes where no “Christian” film has gone before. Michael Ironside’s character has a “big gun” and uses it often.

The main character, played by Casper Van Dien openly mocks Christianity in the first few minutes of the film, expressing a sentiment which is probably held by many non-Christians. Michael York performs a terrific transformation from being the “leader of the world” to becoming the Anti-Christ. Catherine Oxenberg’s character is mostly believable as she appears to be playing “both sides of the fence.” The special effects are good, not on the same level as say, Star Wars, but very cool and unusual. After the opening scene, it seems a little slow for a while, but before long there are many twists and turns (even a car chase or two) which help to keep your attention focused on the developing plot. A couple of my favorite characters were the two prophets, very in-your-face and bold. This movie doesn’t contain the four spiritual laws and by itself probably won’t result in many decisions for Christ, but what it does do (and I think very well) is to make you think and opens up opportunities for meaningful discussions. This movie is an excellent tool for Christians to use in getting someone who would never step foot inside a church building to give some serious thought to things of God both now and as the world as we know it comes to an end. My Ratings: [3.½3½]
—David Duncan, age 40
Whoa! What a movie!… I thought this movie was done in an excellent manner. To be honest I didn’t think it was going to be as good as it was, but it was even better. What a movie! That movie kept me in suspense at all times and what special effects. Whoa! That is the word I kept saying throughout the movie, and even though the first time we saw it the film broke five times in the middle of it. The manager had “The Omega Code” moved to another room and it replaced another movie that night and those that could stay for the 9:30 showing got to see the movie all over again and finally get to see the ending. Whoa! What a movie, …All in all that was a fantastic movie. I believe everyone should see it, for I know they will never be the same after it. Even though we got to see the movie twice, my husband and I want to go and see it again. You really can’t get enough of a good thing. God’s hand is truly upon this film. Our hats go off to Matt Crouch and to all those that were involved in this movie. Again, Praise God for such a clean, family style suspense thriller. My Ratings: [5/5]
—Debbie, age 45
“the best Christian movie ever made!”… In my point of view, the movie wasn’t the best movie ever made, but it was the best Christian movie ever made! You can’t get better than this for 7 million dollars! I think the Anti-Chirst was depicted very well. Micheal York did a fabulous job acting as the Anti-Christ. The acting was superb and how everything came together was really interesting. Is this the way things will happen? I don’t know. But these things will happen because the Word of the Lord, which is the TRUTH, says so. But when people are getting saved at the theatres, then this is the single best movie that was ever made in history! No other movie that I know of has changed lives AT THE MOVIE THEATER!! God makes the impossible, POSSIBLE!! Thank you TBN for expanding and establishing the KINGDOM OF GOD in the movie theaters. You are going where no man has gone before. I pray that this will encourage people to start a ministry in a place that people never even thought about. God bless you in your ministry. My Ratings: [4/4]
—Mathew Thomas, age 23
“wouldn’t mind seeing again”… One thing that you have to realize is that the makers of this movie did make some mistakes, such as in the chronology of the endtimes, some things were out of place, and this movie didn’t emphasize on the fact that through Jesus Christ comes salvation from the worst of the tribulation. But I do agree with the review, in that this is a good movie that I wouldn’t mind seeing again. They did have to dumb it down a bit for the non-christian audience to get them in the door. If that is the price to pay to spread the word then so be it. My Ratings: [4½/3½]
—Kiel Hawkins, age 18
Excellent cast, great plot, excellent acting. I felt an annointing in that movie theatre. Everyone clapped at the end. I felt in my spirit that everyone in that theatre was moved and they felt something in their spirit man. Thank you TBN for an excellent job. My Ratings: [5/4½]
—Anna Graco, age 70
I Thought the movie was great! I’ve seen it twice already and I plan on seeing it again. I Think Michael York did a great job of playing the Antichrist. I also thought the special effects were great! My Ratings: [5/4½]
—Paul, age 44
The Omega Code is what is appearing to be an insurgence of Christianity into modern day film-making. It had a few mistakes and ommisions, yes, however, overall, I liked the movie. However, The Omega Code is listed at Harkins Movie Theaters as “PG”, not “PG-13”. I was very suprised that the theater that they had put the movie in was so packed, that they had to move it to a larger auditorium for the next showing. It had a lot of support. The acting was somewhat predictable, however, there were elements that I was not expecting, and to prevent spoiling the movie, I won’t mention them. I do look forward to Tim LaHaye’s and Jerry Jenkins’ movie, Left Behind. That will cover what The Omega Code did not, primarily, The rapture of Christ’s church, and the aftermath of all the disappearances. All in all, it is an OK movie, one that you can take the family to, but I would expect better from the cast that was selected for this movie. But, for the first venture into mainstream moviemaking, The Omega Code has been an astounding sucess, making the Top Ten on its opening weekend, and with promise to do the same or better the next weekend. My Ratings: [4½/3]
—Jonathan Foertsch, age 18
Overall, I did somewhat enjoy this movie. While the acting was not great, there were gaps in the story line, and it was quite hard to follow, the overall impression of the end times was there. But when you realize they had only 7 million dollars to work with, they did quite a job for such a small budget. It is a good first attempt, and hopefully it will become a starting point for more Christian movies. I guess I can liken this to Christian music, which was not too great just 10 years ago, but has since met and in some cases surpassed “secular” standards. Hopefully, the movie business will follow suit, starting with this one. My Ratings: [4/3]
—Jeremy S., age 15
Contrary to other what other people have been saying here, I think that the Omega Code is a superb movie, well directed, and well written. It also had great special effects, was bibically sound, and it had a great impact on me. I believe this is a great movie for the unbelieving to see. My Ratings: [5/4½]
—John Beard Jr., age 11
I found this story to be intriguing, with lots of twists turns. Michael York, Michael Ironside were excellent. I loved the message and would like to see more Christian movies made. The Omega Code is well worth watching. I give it credit for being a good decent movie. Thanks to all involved. My Ratings: [5/4]
—CD Harris, age 61
Negative
disappointing… The acting was bad, the script was bad, and the movie was boring. I had such high expectations with all of the pre-release hype but was so disappointed in the film. Would have loved to have seen someone come on at the end and give a clear Gospel presentation. Speaking of the ending, did they run out of money? It seemed like it just stopped abruptly. My Ratings: [4/1]
—Bobby Ready, age 42
most important factors missing… I could not wait to see this movie, because I was under the impression that it was a soul saving movie depicting the end times. I must say that I have always considered myself knowledgeable of Revelation and other areas in the Bible describing the end times. However, I felt very confused throughout the movie. It wasn’t until the end of the movie that I realized that the rapture had already taken place and that the end was Armageddon. I was confused because I kept waiting for people to vanish, water turning to blood, pestilences to breakout, and of course, the mark of the beast to beat least mentioned somewhere. The word Rapture or Battle of Armageddon was never mentioned. I feel that if I were to have taken a unsaved person with me I would have fallen short of being able to follow the plot of the movie and left them with a less than half understanding of what it “really” will be like to the unsaved who are left behind. I feel that if anything, this movie would be for those who “do” have understanding of end times and who are saved and have read Revelations. This movie would be entertainment for their families leaving much to the imagination however not compromising their already found salvation. For the unbeliever who may see this movie, I fear that their understanding of what life will be for the unsaved has failed to reach them. If they have never read Revelation or ever heard of the mark of the Beast, they will leave with not much more knowledge than when they first entered the movie. …I do appreciate [the] attempts and desire to bring the message forward to the secular world. I only wish [the] movie would have depicted the rapture and shown some signs of the outside world during that time and most importantly shown the mark of the beast. My Ratings: [3/2]
—Holly Mosley, age 27
Given the quality and style of TBN television programming, the Omega Code is no surprise. My advice: Skip it. My Ratings: [4/1]
—Michael Patrick, age 40
I also have to disagree with the reviewer of this movie. While the quality of the filmmaking was commendable including the special effects and graphics, the content was muddled and confusing. My husband, son [age 19], and I saw it last night and came away greatly disappointed. I agree with the reviewer about the positive aspects of the film concerning family relationships and so on, but the premise of this film was that the one who mastered the Omega Code would control the world. This movie inaccurately placed the power of the anti-christ on his ability to have this code.

If you do not know what Revelation and the book of Daniel have to say about the end times then you have no idea who the two witnesses were in the movie and the movie makes no effort to explain any of this. Every message deciphered in the so-called Omega Code is in the Bible already, so who needs a code? The movie doesn’t have any emphasis at all on the Christian response to the events happening in the world as the anti-christ rises in power except for the hero’s struggle with his faith and his ultimate salvation by calling on the name of Jesus. The ending was even more confusing. The time frames seem to be all off and makes no mention of the rapture whatsoever [whether it comes pre-trib, mid-trib, or post-trib].

In solving the Omega Code, the anti-christ is defeated by “unkown” forces and a new millenium is ushered in which the code indicates as 000 [which I assume is to mean the year 2000]. I don’t think this movie even came close to establishing to the secular world about what end-time prophesy is really all about and to Christians it misses the mark as well. I agree that Tim LaHaye and Jerry Jenkins did terrific job in their “Left Behind” series of books and if they are ever put to the big screen we will be better served in getting the real truth out about the coming “end-times.” My Ratings: [2½/3½]
—Donna Kristiansen, age 49
…I’m glad to see that the majority of readers thus far have stated the facts. Michael York as the anti-christ? Michael Ironside slums here, and Casper “starship troopers” van dien, as a professor of comparative religion / motivational speaker? Geesh. Notice how the word “evolution” is pronounced “EVILoution” by the Michael York character. Wonderfully hokey dialog, particularly from the main character’s wife. “If only you loved me half as much as you love [your daughter]…” the mother being jealous of the daughter? There is also a GLARING continuity error in the film, having to do with the fact makes it very clear that the movie is taking place in the present (the movie if following continuity would have made the Princess Diana references completely incoherent) then skips ahead 3 years, then makes a reference to a key plot point in the movie tying in directly to the beginning of the new millenium? Does the Bible Code show that the new millenium begins in 2002? …the apeing of shots and scenes from the Star Wars movies is just lame. Michael York waving at the jets and the “death star—err, stone earth takeover hologram” were too much for this guy. My Ratings: [2½/1]
—Joe Foster, age 20, non-Christian
“preaching to the choir”… I know that it is difficult to cover such a subject adequately in less than two hours but I did feel that the importance of the Mark of the Beast, the Battle at Armageddon, and the Rapture were subjects that should have been included in some way. Also, it was an insider movie. I heard people wondering what happened as the movie ended with the return of Christ. As such it was “preaching to the choir.” Such a movie would be of value to crack open the Secular mind to the Truth. My Ratings: [4/4]
—George E. Wilson, age 60
stilted and cheezy… While I appreciate the message of The Omega Code, to give it a Moviemaking rating of 4 is ridiculous. This was (from a cinematography standpoint) the worst movie I have seen in a long time. The acting was stilted, the dialogue was cheezy at best, and the picture was horrible—it looked like it was shot on a Super-8 camera. And WHY did they waste 10 minutes on a dream sequence, when they could have expounded more on the events in Revelations (or at least a MUCH better explanation and working of the “Bible Code”)? Not to mention the fact that they went out of their way to keep the Christian element so buried in the movie—the two second “born again” sequence was very lame. My Ratings: [5/1½]
—Robert Toddson, age 24
“a very sad disappointment”… Looking forward to your review of this much “TBN touted” movie. I went to see it last night and it was, in my opinion, a very sad disappointment and a pathetic commentary on Christian film making. Now I understand why the film was not released for critic review. I really wanted this film to be great… I truly did. However, the $7 million dollar budget spent on this film would have been better invested in almost anything other than this project. What is equally ridiculous is Paul Crouch’s son on TBN every night wearing all black clothing and dark sun-glasses (a self made Mr. Hollywood?) touting the tremendous success and impact of this new film… Maybe at some point in the future, a Christian George Lucas type will come along and truly put together a powerful presentation concerning end time events… however, to use some down home vernacular… this ain’t it!
—Rev. Thomas R. Mitchell
hoping upcoming “Left Behind” will be better… I’m sorry but I have to disagree with the reviewer on this movie. The quality of this Christian movie as far as special effects and acting [are disappointing,] but the content is a different story. This movie apparently was to take place when the Antichrist came to power. However, there was no mention at all of the rapture. The gospel message was not clear and there was a comment in the movie about the Antichrist killing his father? The Antichrist’s father is Satan. How can you kill Satan? I am surprised at what TBN put out on the big screen. I just hope that Tim LaHaye and Jerry Jenkins of the “Left Behind” series take note and do a better job than TBN on their upcoming movie next year. My Ratings: [3½/3]
—John T, age 34
“anti-Catholic bias”… “The Omega Code”, unfortunately, contains much anti-Catholic bias. For one thing, the Roman clerics in the movie are depicted as wearing Greek Orthodox (not Catholic) garb. I congratulate TBN for its financial success, but I would hope in the 21st Century, Christians would be above bashing other Christians…
—Brian Nigro, age 26
“amateurish”… Cognizant of the fact that “where there is personal taste involved, there is no argument”, I regret to say that this film ranks among the worst films I have ever seen. After all of the hype, my wife and I went fully expecting to see a quality movie but unfortunately we were very disappointed. The acting was amateurish, the directing worse and the script was atrocious. It was all we could do to stay in our seats—and not walk out! Without question the intentions/objectives of this movie were admirable but it severely misses the mark… I for one would be utterly embarrassed to invite an unsaved friend to see this movie! This movie could send your credibility down the drain with both your saved and lost friends! I am confident that however well intentioned, this film will quickly disappear from the movie scene and be eagerly forgotten by those unfortunate enough to have wasted the price of a ticket to see it.
—Will Case, age 47
I’m kind of amazed by the positive reception this movie has been getting here, since I’d rate it as one of the most cartoonishly awful movies I’ve ever seen, so much so that I kept imagining how the guys on “Mystery Science Theater 3000” would handle it. The writing, acting, direction, production values—everything was excreble. Ironically, every good Christian movie I’ve ever seen was made by Hollywood or a talented independent with artistic, rather than evangelical, aims, and this movie is a perfect example of why. “Movies” made by Christian groups tend to be slapdash PSAs disguised as movies. Bottom line: just because it’s Christian doesn’t mean it’s good. My Ratings: [3/1]
—Erin Hunt, age 22
I admire Christian production companies for trying to get a feature like this produced. Sadly, like far too many other Christian productions, this was really bad. Laughably bad dialogue, mediocre acting and directing. And unfortunately, just like too many Hollywood productions, they haven’t figured out that subtlety is far more effective than bashing people over the heads, be that in regards to the special effects, or the message, however good it may be. The other problem with a movie like this is that I’d be hard pressed to find a non-Christian who has any interest whatsoever in seeing this film, let alone be impacted by it. So while Christians will be happy that a Christian message is put in a movie, it’s no great evangelical tool. It would really make my day to see some Christian production that actually has a really good grip on the language of cinema, both as entertainment and art. This, unfortunately, is neither. My Ratings: [4/1]
—Jason Murphy, age 20
You gotta be kidding! Hey I’m no movie making pro but… comparing this movie to Star Wars? Come on now. I do congratulate TBN’s try at film making. However, I cannot imagine how this contrived mess ever made it to the screen. The acting is terrible, special effects were cheesy, and the script was errr writing was terrible. This could have been a classic film of good and evil. Unfortuantely TBN tried to convey a message that is too hard to tell in one movie. This movie would have served the public better if the story was more focused. Only at the end did I really enjoy the movie errr as the credits rolled. My Ratings: [3/2]
—Duane Thomas, age 39
I appreciate any opportunity that the Christian community has to make an impression on the secular world. I also thank TBN for making such an effort, as well as the actors and actresses that made certain monetary sacrifices for being in a small budget film. But, I have to say that my expectations were let down considerably, primarily due to the content. I believe that to accurately represent the book of Revelation and the Tribulation, one MUST represent the timeline accurately as well as the misery that the world will be suffering. If I were not a Christian and had no knowledge of Revelation, I don’t think this movie would have persuaded me to become a Christian. Neither would it have given me a clear perspective on how terrible the Tribulation will be. I thank TBN for their efforts, but this movie seems more an effort to show a clean action film rather than an effort to minister to the lost and prepare them for Jesus Christ’s soon return. I support this film in an effort to bring Hollywood around to morally cleaning up their films, but I sincerely hope that we will see more accurate portrait of the Bible in future Christian movies. My Ratings: [4½/2½]
—Troy Snowden, age 29
After seeing “The Omega Code,” and then watching the subsequent rhetoric about its greatness by Matt Crouch, et.al.; I’m reminded of the old fairy tale entitled “The Emperor’s New Clothes.” THE EMPEROR IS NAKED!!! This is not great stuff, this is not breakthrough, this is not high quality (even for a $7 million budget), this is… oh well. Not only is this not high quality in terms of production, direction, writing and acting… it is theologically awful. Where was the the message of the Gospel: You know, Jesus Christ died and rose again for you. Where was the Church? You know, the bride of Christ, all glorious without spot or wrinkle? Last, I was greatly disappointed at the not-so-subtle suggestion about blowing up the Dome of the Rock. The implication was that if that goes, the Temple gets to be built. Also, the direct indictment of those “churches” which do not agree with this eschatological perspective as being part of the Beast System. Not to mention the Catholic/Orthodox bashing that went on. I am a pastor and am longing for Christ-centered movies to get into Hollywood… But, not like this. I applaud TBN’s attempt, but let’s be honest… the Emperor has no clothes on. My Ratings: [2/1]
—David Copp, age 36
How you could even speak of “The Hiding Place” and “The Omega Code” in the same sentence is beyond me! There is no comparison, in my opinion; “Hiding…” is incomparable in every way—story line (I’m a sucker for a true story), acting, and everything was definitely academy award material, whereas “Code” was—at best—cheesy. It was over-acted by Casper, on target Biblically in some ways, but at the same time didn’t address at all the events that would be going on in the world simultaneously, as it was set during the Tribulation, but Casper’s family lifestyle did not reflect anything other than the world going on “normally” as it always has! Of course, no mention of the rapture having taken place. Also, Casper’s conversion experience was too minimal and not emphasized enough. I have been watching the trailers and anticipating this movie for some months, couldn’t WAIT, and was extremely disappointed in it. Sorry… I cannot recommend it to anyone.
—Hila Lewis, age 56
Van Dien comes off believably as a spiritual Tony Robbins, and York gets to chew a lot of scenery, aided by Michael Ironside as his assistant, Dominic, who has world leadership plans of his own. So why were decent actors like these slumming in this film? The direction is paint-by-numbers, really coming off more as a TV movie of the week than a feature film, despite big-budget special effects and location shoots, and the musical score makes the whole thing seem, well, cheesy. The script doesn’t help. It’s full of gaps, the kind of gaps my math teacher used to point out in my calculus proofs by writing “Then a Miracle Occurred!” Except this movie expects that to serve as an explanation. Hey, I’m all for big budget movies being produced by conservative religious groups—in fact, I say it’s about time. But this film hasn’t quite shaken off the grated cheese so often associated with Christian film and video. You can tell from frame one what kind of movie this is and where it’s going, which means that as an evangelical tool, “The Omega Code” doesn’t come through. But if you’re looking for a positive action film to take your pre-teens to, you can do a lot worse. So don’t pay full price for “The Omega Code,” but don’t ignore it, because there will be more films like it. I just hope they’re better ones. My Ratings: [4½/1½]
—Jay Hinkelman, age 31
This movie is so laughably bad, that I wish people did not know it is associated with the Gospel. Actually, some people might not even get it, because the message is almost as hidden as the “codes” being deciphered in the Torah. It’s no more a Christian movie than “The Omen,” and has less scriptural paralells than “The Matrix.” Just silly.
—David Forsmark, age 38
I went to see the movie the first weekend. More time should have been used developing the characters. Can’t say I really cared about them. The movie didn’t flow very well. It was fast and all, but not as organized as it could have been. Most of the lines were good. If they were going to talk like Shakespeare I wish they would have prepared the audience for that with a shot of a book or something. I think a viewer would need to know about the endtimes to understand Omega Code. Overall; it was a good try. I cannot honestly recommend someone go to see it. Sorry. My Ratings: [4/2½]
—Maria D. Robinson, age 37
Simply because “The Omega Code” sends a pro-Christian message, doesn’t make it a good film. I found it vapid and silly, and Christians who come away from it proclaiming it a great film should know better. you’ll find better and more genuine, insightful Christian value for your dollar with a film like “The Straight Story,” than you will with this shallow muck. My Ratings: [3/1]
—Nick, age 23
I guess I’m a little distressed. TBN—a dubious organization to begin with—bankrolls a movie about an unproven myth “The Bible/Omega Code.” Most major reviews I’ve read that haven’t been by Christians (who, to their credit, are going to have a hard time NOT being baised towards it) haven’t given it much of a positive review. The idea of basing a movie on a theory that has been discounted by scores of Christians and non-Christians alike is a stretch to begin with. Does this teach people that taking the Bible at face value isn’t enough? It appears so. And then there is a arrogance of the makers. Mr. Crouch was on TBN a little while ago, flat out saying that to be a critic of this movie is a SIN. A SIN??? Not even Paul had this attitude! (Where he trumpted the idea of going back and checking facts with scripture). Overall, yes the movie mentions Jesus in a positive light, but at what price? After the Christians stop buying out the entire theather for themselves (a rather selfish thing to do when one is claiming its going to minister), will it be in the Top 10? My Ratings: [1/1½]
—Justin, age 22
First of all I want TBN to know I really enjoyed going to a movie that I knew wouldn’t offend me. However, I was a little disappointed with the story line. I kept thinking, why would TBN make a movie, but leave out something as important as mention of the Rapture. I agree that the cinematography isn’t up to Hollywood standards. However, I still hope they get the message that there’s hundreds of thousands of people out here, and we want Hollywood to know that WE NEED MORE MOVIES THAT DON’T OFFEND THE EARS AND EYES. I hope this movie is the stepping stone that opens the door to good Christian movies. My Ratings: [3½/2]
—Christine Hudspeth, age 51
…Terrible acting + Bad script + Aweful Directing = millions of souls saved? Now don’t get me wrong. I certainly applaud Christians making movies. But if you’re going to do it, please do it right. Personally, it looked a little like an infomercial for Hal Lindseys “Great Late Planet Earth”. And Casper Van Dien? (whose big credential is an awful adaption of a brilliant Heinlein novel “Starship Troopers”). I think, if I had the choice, I would have rather sat through 99 minutes of TBN, and believe me folks that ain’t saying too much.
—Don Lambirth, age 31