Movie Review

The Window

MPAA Rating: Not Rated

Reviewed by: Ken James
CONTRIBUTOR

Excellent!
Moviemaking Quality:

Primary Audience:
Teen to Adult
Genre:
Christian Drama
Length:
30 min.
Year of Release:
1999
USA Release:
_____
Relevant Issues
Box art for “The Window”

Why does God allow innocent people to suffer? Answer

What about the issue of suffering? Doesn’t this prove that there is no God and that we are on our own? Answer

Does God feel our pain? Answer

What about the Psalm 91 promises? (“…no harm will befall you, no disaster will come near your tent…”) Answer

The Origin of bad—How did bad things come about? Answer

What kind of world would you create? Answer

Featuring: Gregory J. Cooper, Leslie Rainey, Tim Wright, Michelle Hoppe, Jason Patrick Nagy, Jessica Law
Director: Dan Rutledge
Producer: Dan Rutledge
Distributor: _____

Have you ever noticed that there’s a lot of bitter people in this world? Some Christians are content to stay in their bubble and disregard the biblical commandment to be “salt and light” to a dying world. Others, like bedridden Josiah Carver (Leslie Rainey), aren’t afraid to reach out to the hurting and offer them truth and hope that has one of two effects: they’re either drawn to it or repulsed by it. “For we are to God the aroma of Christ among those who are being saved and those who are perishing. To the one we are the smell of death; to the other, the fragrance of life.” (2 Cor. 2:15-16. See also I Cor. 1:18).

Gregory J. Cooper in “The Window” Blake Cain (Gregory J. Cooper) is a poster-boy for bitterness and despair. A regular at the city hospital where he lies in a neck brace next to Josiah, Blake has tried unsuccessfully to commit suicide several times just to escape this present world. Ever jovial Josiah jokingly points out “I never could understand how anyone can fail at suicide… did you use a rubber knife or something?”

This lovable Christian man is a real talker, but a master at weaving truth into everyday conversation. A favorite topic of his is Jesus, naturally, and specifically the story of the lame man who was lowered through the roof to hear Jesus speak. (Mark 2) In a climactic scene, Blake calculatedly poses the weighty question “Did you ever think that maybe, maybe the paralyzed man didn’t want to be lowered through the stupid roof. That maybe being paralyzed was the perfect fitting climax to a life not worth walking around for? That all he ever wanted was to be left alone?” Josiah lovingly listens as the weight of his sin impacts him and breaks him down even more.

Leslie Rainey in “The Window” The entire 30-minute story takes place within the confines of a hospital room. Flashbacks to Blake’s wrecked life and fatal accident that killed a high school boy haunt him at night. Slowly but surely, just like Lydia in Acts 16:14, Blake finally begins to open his heart to the message of God’s love and forgiveness. In a stirrng story conclusion we see just how much Christ-likeness and love Leslie shows.

The title for “The Window” comes from a key element in the story. As both men lay confined in bed, the window next to Josiah offers glimpses of “normal” life… a nearby park described by Josiah offers escape as he describes to Blake the father and son shooting hoops, the jogger, blues guitar player, the man with the donuts, and other events. It becomes their bonding time, even as the unwilling Blake listens. “I’ll let you talk about the window, but I draw the line at bible stories”, he informs. The window is the bridge between the two men.

This modern day parable of redemption and healing is from director Dan Rutledge. The film possesses many strengths often lacking in Christian cinema: strong acting, technical quality (shot on film instead of video), and a powerful message.

Age level: older teen to adult. The most appropriate audiences may include those whose lives are hard and without hope: the prisoner, the stranger, the single parent, and the hurting.


Viewer Comments
…Beyond the clear portrayal of the Gospel, the best part about the film is the acting talent of Leslie Rainey…
—Laura Bagby, Christian Broadcasting Network